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Thread: Why is there no black keys between EF and BC

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    Default Why is there no black keys between EF and BC

    Why is there no black key between EF and BC? Is there any theory / STORY behind it??
    Last edited by rubenimc; 05-26-2010 at 12:12 PM.
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    Well the postulation behind the EF key denotes a semi-denomative wave. A semi-denomative wave is nothing more than a fibulation of a posterior note. Being that BC is a core wave, and therefore produces dynamic sudsounds on the Height Frequency, there doesn't have to be conductor between those two.

    Hope that helps

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by WordzMyth View Post
    Well the postulation behind the EF key denotes a semi-denomative wave. A semi-denomative wave is nothing more than a fibulation of a posterior note. Being that BC is a core wave, and therefore produces dynamic sudsounds on the Height Frequency, there doesn't have to be conductor between those two.

    Hope that helps
    ROFL!!

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    What do you mean? It's true

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    Because E sharp is the same as F, F flat is the same as E, B sharp is the same as C, and C flat is the same as B. They're enharmonic tones and putting a black key there wouldn't really serve much of a purpose.

  6. #6

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    I think it is so c major is all white keys, lol.
    Probably just the creator of the piano's idea to 1. make it easyer to find your place, and 2, to make scales easier.

  7. #7

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    To answer that we may have to ask why there ARE black notes elsewhere. My own personal assumption has always been that they are there for some reason to do with simplifying finger positioning, or something along those lines. Feel free to shoot me down anyone, but I always assumed it was based on the major scale progression: tone, tone, semi-tone, tone, tone, tone, semitone....where the two semi-tones are where the black notes are missing! Is that about right. I guess if there were no black notes, the thirteen white notes would be so far apart that no-one would be able to span an octave, either.
    To summarise, Probably down to the bloke that invented the keyboard hundreds of years ago.

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    The reason that I always understood was that because every scale has the pattern of whole and half steps. The pattern is whole whole half, whole whole whole half. the reason there is no black key between EF and BC is because there is a half step between the two notes. If it were a whole step between the it would go from E to C#. I hope this makes sense to you and I hope this helps=)

  9. #9

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    Thanks for your comments guys. But I haven't yet got a (PERFECT) answer to my question.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by rubenimc View Post
    Thanks for your comments guys. But I haven't yet got a (PERFECT) answer to my question.
    You have. Check's Wordz' answer. It explains your question perfectly, if you need it simplified, what he's basically saying is that there doesn't need to be.
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    The reason is "mathematics"....of frequencies

    It was instrument designers, mixed with composers that gave us the 12 semitone scale in European style tunings....leading to the North Americas...and eventually becoming the norm.
    Last edited by Muzoid; 06-13-2010 at 12:53 AM.
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  12. #12

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    Hi All,

    I agree the rule has to be

    one-one-half, one-one-one-half for a Major scale. But what if some one introduces quarter tone in between and make it some thing like,

    half-one-quarter-quarter-half, quarter-half-half-quarter-one-quarter-half-quarter.

    Some one might introduce these kind of method instead of playing in two or more octaves for a single hand. I mean we will have lot of keys in one octave itself. So need not go for the third. (we can touch some parts of the second)

    LOL

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    Composers have already done this....inventing micro tones

    Neil Young sings slightly sharp......

    haha

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Muzoid View Post
    Composers have already done this....inventing micro tones

    Neil Young sings slightly sharp......

    haha
    I should have known this already before commenting. anyways thanks for that answer

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrypticWeirdo View Post
    Because E sharp is the same as F, F flat is the same as E, B sharp is the same as C, and C flat is the same as B. They're enharmonic tones and putting a black key there wouldn't really serve much of a purpose.
    This.

    I don't know why people ignored this answer.
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